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St. Francis Myrrh (250ml)

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1535
CA$49.99
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Myrrh(Commiphora myrrha; 200 mg/ml)Traditionally used to treat infections and inflammations of the gums, mouth, throat and head, including upper respiratory catarrhal conditions and the common cold.A gum resin, myrrh has been held in high esteem in various ways--as an incense, a flavouring agent and a powerful healing remedy--by virtually all civilizations of East and West over the ages. In the first century BC, for example, myrrh's antimicrobial properties were used to prevent the fermentation of wine to vinegar.Naturopathic physician William Mitchell remarks that, "Herbalists back to the ancient Egyptians used myrrh to treat stomatitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, and toothache."Health writer Michael Castleman points out that the Eclectic physicians of the early part of the last century "prescribed the herb internally for colds, laryngitis, asthma, bronchitis... sore throat, dental cavities, and bad breath."Among the indications it lists for myrrh, the normative British Herbal Pharmacopoeia includes mouth ulcers, pharyngitis, respiratory catarrh, common cold, and gingivitis."Several studies" explains a contemporary researcher, "have demonstrated myrrh's anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anaesthetic, and anti-microbial properties.""Myrrh," says herbalist David Hoffmann in an excellent monographic overview of this healing substance, "is an effective antimicrobial agent that has been shown to work in two complementary ways. Its primary action is to stimulate the production of white blood corpuscles, which have antipathogenic actions. Secondarily, it has a direct antimicrobial effect.""Myrrh," Hoffmann continues, "may be used in a wide range of conditions appropriate for treatment with an antimicrobial agent. It finds specific use in the treatment of infections of the mouth, such as mouth ulcers, gingivitis, and pyorrhea, as well as catarrhal problems, such as pharyngitis and sinusitis. Myrrh is often employed as part of an approach to the treatment of the common cold, and may be of benefit for laryngitis and respiratory complaints."In confirmation of its effectiveness, leading herbalist Michael Tierra notes that, "Myrrh is one of the best antiseptics known... Internally, myrrh has a variety of uses including the treatment of... chronic catarrh (phlegm) and bronchial congestion... It also combines well with echinacea root, goldenseal, chaparral and garlic as an antibiotic and antiviral agent against most acute inflammatory conditions."
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Myrrh

(Commiphora myrrha; 200 mg/ml)

Traditionally used to treat infections and inflammations of the gums, mouth, throat and head, including upper respiratory catarrhal conditions and the common cold.

A gum resin, myrrh has been held in high esteem in various ways--as an incense, a flavouring agent and a powerful healing remedy--by virtually all civilizations of East and West over the ages. In the first century BC, for example, myrrh's antimicrobial properties were used to prevent the fermentation of wine to vinegar.

Naturopathic physician William Mitchell remarks that, "Herbalists back to the ancient Egyptians used myrrh to treat stomatitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, and toothache."

Health writer Michael Castleman points out that the Eclectic physicians of the early part of the last century "prescribed the herb internally for colds, laryngitis, asthma, bronchitis... sore throat, dental cavities, and bad breath."

Among the indications it lists for myrrh, the normative British Herbal Pharmacopoeia includes mouth ulcers, pharyngitis, respiratory catarrh, common cold, and gingivitis.

"Several studies" explains a contemporary researcher, "have demonstrated myrrh's anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anaesthetic, and anti-microbial properties."

"Myrrh," says herbalist David Hoffmann in an excellent monographic overview of this healing substance, "is an effective antimicrobial agent that has been shown to work in two complementary ways. Its primary action is to stimulate the production of white blood corpuscles, which have antipathogenic actions. Secondarily, it has a direct antimicrobial effect."

"Myrrh," Hoffmann continues, "may be used in a wide range of conditions appropriate for treatment with an antimicrobial agent. It finds specific use in the treatment of infections of the mouth, such as mouth ulcers, gingivitis, and pyorrhea, as well as catarrhal problems, such as pharyngitis and sinusitis. Myrrh is often employed as part of an approach to the treatment of the common cold, and may be of benefit for laryngitis and respiratory complaints."

In confirmation of its effectiveness, leading herbalist Michael Tierra notes that, "Myrrh is one of the best antiseptics known... Internally, myrrh has a variety of uses including the treatment of... chronic catarrh (phlegm) and bronchial congestion... It also combines well with echinacea root, goldenseal, chaparral and garlic as an antibiotic and antiviral agent against most acute inflammatory conditions."

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