Feeling sore? Not recovering from your workouts fast enough?Trying to pack on size Well then, let’s talk about Amino Acids , particularly one of the most abundant amino acids in the body, glutamine.

What is glutamine?
Glutamine is a non-essential amino acid, which means our bodies can make its own supply of glutamine. Glutamine can be found both in the blood stream and the musculoskeletal system. If you’re looking to get more glutamine from your diet, there are a few foods you can include: most dairy products Proteins , like beef and fish, and vegetable sources like raw spinach and parsley.

Glutamine has number of biomechanical functions

  • Aids in the synthesis of DNA.
  • Plays a major role in protein synthesis.
  • Is a fuel source of enterocytes (cells of the muscle lining of the small intestines), helping with digestion.
  • Especially for those with Crohn’s disease.
  • Helps support Immune function.
  • Blocks cortisol-induced protein catabolism that may lead to tissue breakdown.

How is it a medical alternative?
Glutamine has been linked to many different uses in the medical and the alternative health communities. There have been recent studies regarding the effects of glutamine and intestinal effects, showing how it aids in gut barrier function and with general waste mobility, such as IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome).

How can it help with exercise?
When it comes to physical exercise and working out, glutamine can help prolong a workout. Glutamine can be converted into alanine, an amino acid that the liver converts into glucose, supplying additional fuel to muscles.

It can also be taken as a supplement
Ideally, an athlete should take 5 grams of glutamine after a workout to aid in a faster recovery. Or, if you want to take it to gain its general Health benefits, you can take it as a supplement to your diet.

Dave Reesor, NSCA-CPT, MES is a Certified Personal Trainer and a Medical Exercise Specialist with a diploma in Fitness and Health Promotions from Humber College.